Saturday, 1 October 2016

TypeScript for C# Developers - Chris Klug

Over the last few years, JavaScript has solidified itself as the universal language of the Web. All attempts to change this, like Flash and Silverlight, have failed. So you might as well accept that if you are going to be working with anything related to the internet, it is highly likely that you will be using JavaScript; at least for the foreseeable future. And even if you ignore the browser and stay on the server, projects like Node.js is gaining popularity and putting JavaScript there as well. Unfortunately, JavaScript is not the easiest language to learn and understand. It is full of awesome features and some really bad ones. And being as flexible as it is, tooling has a hard time keeping up. And this is where TypeScript comes in. TypeScript is a superset to JavaScript that tries to solve a lot of these problems, and make the code more structured, and less error prone. And it also offers tooling support in a way that JavaScript just can't. So why not join this session and get an introduction to TypeScript, and see what it can do for you? - Chris Klug

Thursday, 29 September 2016

The Future of C# - Dustin Campbell, Mads Torgersen

Since Roslyn shipped last year we’ve been hard at work building on it to improve tooling, add new language features and enhance Roslyn itself. In this session Dustin and Mads will play with fire, showing early versions of new C# 7 language features such as tuples and pattern matching, new editor features like code style and source generators, and much more. - Dustin Campbell, Mads Torgersen

Wednesday, 28 September 2016

Life As A Developer: My Code Does Not Work Because I Am A Victim Of Complex Societal Factors That Are Beyond My Control…. – James Mickens

"What are the best practices for shipping high-quality software?" This question is an example of a question that I will not answer in my talk. Instead, I will describe why any software project that contains more than 10 lines of code is guaranteed to fail. Using my fragmentary knowledge of the laws of thermodynamics, I will explain why code is like a proton that must ultimately turn into a crystal or, uh, whatever it is that thermodynamics says will happen. I will demonstrate how unit tests, functional programming, and UML diagrams fail to address the primary source of software failure (namely, that software is an inherently bad idea because our brains evolved to hunt giant sloths with primitive stone tools, and MongoDB only partially resembles a giant sloth).
I will conclude the talk by luring a group of agile programming experts into a large cardboard box using a collection of buzzwords like "evolutionary development" and "cross-functional team;" once captured, they will be forced to implement obscene, poorly-specified COBOL algorithms as I laugh maniacally and disable my compiler warnings. – James Mickens


Tuesday, 27 September 2016

The Idiot’s Guide to Quashing Microservices - Hani Suleiman

So your boss, annoying coworker, or random stranger has cornered you and started screaming at you that micro services are the answer to every problem you’ve had (and many you’ve never had).

You feel scared, you feel angry, and you’re not sure of what to do next. Do you jump in enthusiastically, or do you risk looking like a grinch by saying no?

In this talk, we’ll explore options between those two extremes. We’ll arm you with intelligent rebuttals and holes against microservices pitches that nobody puts on the brochures. The financial industry often has interesting restrictions and requirements, and a naive approach to microservices is bound to run afoul of all of these without sufficient preparation. - Hani Suleiman