Tuesday, 31 January 2017

Lessons from a quarter of a billion breached records - Troy Hunt


What motivates attackers to dump data publicly? How is it sold, traded and redistributed and for that matter, what even causes adversaries to go public with it? These are all questions I’ve dealt with over the years running the ethical data breach search service “Have I been pwned”. It’s also given me the opportunity to interact with everyone from the attackers breaching these systems to the impacted organisations to law enforcement agencies.
In this talk, I’ll share the lessons learned from working with more than a quarter of a billion publicly dumped records as a result of major data breaches. The talk sheds light on how this class of adversary operates and the weaknesses within organisations they continually manage to exploit. It’s a unique inside look at security from a very real world and very actionable perspective.

source: ndc

Monday, 30 January 2017

Deliberate Architecture - Robert Smallshire



Step back from your system and take a look at its architecture. Are the major structures and technology choices the result of conscious decisions, or have they emerged as the system has evolved? Architecture is often an ad hoc, responsive process where designs get stuck in local minima while ever more features are piled into the system.  Such systems often fail to live up to the origin vision and expectations of stakeholders.

In this talk we look at how to design systems which are a purely a function of the major forces acting on a solution, rather than being modishly reflective of the prevailing software zeitgeist. We’ll explore the idea that software architecture, and hence software architects, should focus deliberately on the constraints and qualities of system design, and avoid getting too distracted by features.

source: goto

Sunday, 29 January 2017

Back to basics: the mess we've made of our fundamental data types - Jon Skeet

"When it comes down to it, all our data is just made of 1s and 0s. But data in the real world is obviously much more complex than that, so we impose extra meaning on top of it. We take it for granted that we can represent numbers, text and date/time information in our programs... indeed, these are three of the core building blocks which are used in just about every data model imaginable.

So how is it that it's all so broken? Why is Stack Overflow full of questions about arithmetic being "broken" because of using float or double? Is there any hope for things ever getting better?

In this talk, I'll give some examples of what's wrong with the world, allocate blame to just about everyone involved, and give a few suggestions to avoid getting burned. In all of this I'll be ably assisted by my friend, Tony the Pony."

source: devday

Saturday, 28 January 2017

Cluster Management at Google with Borg - John Wilkes


Cluster management is the set of tools and processes that Google uses to control the computing infrastructure in our data centers. It includes allocating resources to different applications on our fleet of computers, looking after software installations and hardware, monitoring, and many other things. I'll provide an overview of what we can do, and explain how the lessons we've learned have driven the design of Kubernetes, our new open-source cluster management system. We certainly don't have all the answers, but we do have some pretty impressive systems.

source: goto

Friday, 27 January 2017

Scaling Web Operations with Distributed Cluster Schedulers - Diptanu Gon Choudhury



Diptanu is a Senior Engineer at HashiCorp, and works on large-scale distributed systems, cluster schedulers, service discovery and highly available and high throughput systems on the public cloud. He is a core committer to the Nomad cluster scheduler which has a parallel and distributed scheduler and support heterogeneous virtualized workloads.
Prior to HashiCorp, Diptanu worked in the Cloud Platform group at Netflix, where he worked on the core platform infrastructure that powered the Microservices infrastructure of Netflix. He worked on Apache Mesos and wrote a cluster scheduler for running clusters of Docker containers on AWS, and also contributed to various reactive IPC and service discovery infrastructure projects.

source: build stuff

Thursday, 26 January 2017

Secure by Design – the Architect's Guide to Security Design Principles - Eoin Woods


Security is an ever more important topic for system designers. As our world becomes digital, today’s safely-hidden back office system is tomorrow’s public API, open to anyone on the Internet with a hacking tool and time on their hands. So the days of hoping that security is someone else’s problem are over.

The security community has developed a well understood set of principles used to build systems that are secure (or at least securable) by design, but this topic often isn’t included in the training of software developers, assuming that it’s only relevant to security specialists.

In this talk, we will briefly discuss why security needs to be addressed as part of architecture work and then introduce a set of proven principles for the architecture of secure systems, explaining each in the context of mainstream system design, rather than in the specialised language of security engineering. Our technical examples will be Java centric, but the principles are equally applicable to other technology stacks.

source: goto

Wednesday, 25 January 2017

Promise to Not Use Promises: Observables in ES.next - Brian Holt



ES6’s native support for Promises landed just late enough for Brian Holt to realize that he should never use them. He’ll explain how Observables, a spec that forms the basis of RxJS and is in ongoing discussion to perhaps land in ES.next, made him see the light. Brian outlines what Observables are, how to use Observables in code today using RxJS, how Observables can totally eclipse the use of Promises, and what the state of the Observable spec is for native JavaScript. Participants will leave with the knowledge of a forthcoming tool they can add now to their toolbox.

source: devday

Tuesday, 24 January 2017

Cluster Management at Google with Borg - John Wilkes


Cluster management is the set of tools and processes that Google uses to control the computing infrastructure in our data centers. It includes allocating resources to different applications on our fleet of computers, looking after software installations and hardware, monitoring, and many other things. I'll provide an overview of what we can do, and explain how the lessons we've learned have driven the design of Kubernetes, our new open-source cluster management system. We certainly don't have all the answers, but we do have some pretty impressive systems.

cource: goto

Monday, 23 January 2017

React: Learn Once Write Anywhere - Brian Holt


React has set the Front-End development world on fire. It seems nearly over night that React became the darling of JavaScripts developers everywhere and before you knew it, sites like Netflix, reddit, Khan Academy, Airbnb, and more were rewriting entire front ends to harness that power.

The React inferno isn't contained to just the DOM though; other communities have taken notice and are beginning to harness the power of the one-way data flow that React enforces. In this talk we'll give you a brief overview of why React is so (r)evolutionary for user interface development and some other communities that have taken hold of it as well. We'll talk about seeing React everywhere from the DOM to the terminal, native mobile, game consoles, three dimensional environments, and even virtual reality.

source: devday

Sunday, 22 January 2017

Handling Billions Of Edges in a Graph Database - Michael Hackstein


The amount and complexity of data rises. The need for a database capable of dealing with those requirements is rising as well. Modern graph databases are designed to handle the complexity but what about the increasing amount of data? When hitting a certain size of a graph many dedicated graph databases reach their limits in vertical or most common horizontal scalability.

In this talk I will address the glitches and most importantly the solutions on the journey to a scalable and distributed graph database. The main topics of this talk are:

- Modern architectures in graph databases
- Scaling a graph: Bottlenecks in read and write performance
- Index free adjacency or hybrid indexes for graphs?
- Dealing with billions of edges: A graphy journey to San Francisco with ArangoDB

source: goto

Saturday, 21 January 2017

Deliberate Architecture - Robert Smallshire


Step back from your system and take a look at its architecture. Are the major structures and technology choices the result of conscious decisions, or have they emerged as the system has evolved? Architecture is often an ad hoc, responsive process where designs get stuck in local minima while ever more features are piled into the system.  Such systems often fail to live up to the origin vision and expectations of stakeholders.


In this talk we look at how to design systems which are a purely a function of the major forces acting on a solution, rather than being modishly reflective of the prevailing software zeitgeist. We’ll explore the idea that software architecture, and hence software architects, should focus deliberately on the constraints and qualities of system design, and avoid getting too distracted by features.

source: goto

Friday, 20 January 2017

To The Moon - Russ Olsen


We all have moments that change the way we think, the way we look at the world, the things we want to do with our lives. On July 20, 1969 millions of people had one of those transforming experiences: Two men landed on the Moon and nothing was ever the same again. Why did we go to the Moon? How did we get there? What was it like to witness it all? And what does any of this have to do with writing software 40 years later? In this talk, Russ Olsen will take you back to a humid Sunday afternoon that changed his life. It might yet change yours.

source: devday

Thursday, 19 January 2017

Building Mobile Apps that Work Online & Offline - Wayne Carter


Xamarin and Couchbase have jointly developed Couchbase Lite for .NET — a NoSQL database optimized for mobile. Let Wayne Carter and Zack Gramana show you how its low-friction document datastore, powerful MapReduce queries, and drop-dead simple synchronization combine to help you build awesome apps faster and easier! We'll cover common use cases and show you just how easy it is to integrate into your apps so they "just work" — anytime, anywhere.

source: xamarin evolve

Wednesday, 18 January 2017

Keynote: Go To There and Back Again - Douglas Crockford



The March of Progress is not a stable thing. It moves in fits, and frequently changes direction. N steps forward. M steps back. Can we get there from here? Are we there yet? JavaScript has become incredibly popular, and yet is little loved and much hated. And it is trying to change while petrified by its own popularity. We'll look at the history of some current controversies in language design, starting with Dijkstra's letter to the editor. A go to technology is sometimes useful and so must be eliminated.


source: DEVintersection 2016

Optimism - Reginald Braithwaite


Reginald lives with depression. In this talk he will share Dr. Martin Seligman’s three techniques for reprogramming our brains to think optimistically, and explain how they have helped him feel better, accomplish more, and be a better member of the Ruby community. Whether you have ever struggled with your mood or not, they just might help you change your life.

source: devday

Tuesday, 17 January 2017

Where do you want to go today? - Glenn F. Henriksen


Are you in the place you want to be? Are you moving into unknown territory or thinking about stepping up, but you don't really know how? We'll talk about the different roles a developer can, and probably will, have in a lifetime, how to handle them, how to prevent some of them and how to get to the ones you want faster. In short, how to manage your career like a proper project and not just wing it all the time. I'll claim to have picked up some insight in a few different roles, warn you against some of my stupid mistakes and share some stories.
All in all you should get some inspiration and tools to help you decide where to go and how to get there.


source: ndc

Monday, 16 January 2017

The Things Git Can Do (that none of the GUIs ever told you about) - Enrico Campidoglio


It took less than a decade for Git to become the de-facto standard in version control systems. Most people who use it praise its speed. Some appreciate its flexibility. Everyone criticizes its unwarranted complexity. In order to make Git more approachable, a number of GUIs have been developed on top of it. While many of them have contributed to its widespread popularity, they all share a common design flaw: sacrificing Git’s true potential on the altar of user-friendliness.
Regardless of how many features these tools may have, no graphical metaphor can effectively represent what was conceived for the command line. In this session I’ll demonstrate exactly what Git can do for you that none of the GUI tools ever tells you about. Quickly moving chunks of commits between branches, custom history visualizations, alternative workflows and even debugging are only some of the things I’ll demonstrate, all 100% from the command line.
If you’re using Git through a GUI, you’re missing out. Let me show you why.

source: wroc#

Sunday, 15 January 2017

Build Real-Time Websites and Apps with SignalR - Rachel Appel



If you've ever wanted to build a highly responsive app that leverages a real-time communications library, then SignalR is for you! Real-time Web functionality is the ability to have the server push messaging aggressively to the client, rather than relying on the client to make multiple and frequent requests. SignalR is a set of ASP.NET server and client libraries that you can use to build real time, scalable, Web sites and apps. You can use SignalR in both enterprise and consumer apps, and across platforms. This session covers what you need to know to build a SignalR app that connects multiple clients instantaneously.

source: visual studio live

Saturday, 14 January 2017

Talk To Your Microservice Via a Chat Bot, not UI - Yegor Bugayenko


In most cases, it is convenient to have some human interaction with a web (micro-)service, no matter how small it is. A traditional approach would be to create an HTTP interface, where user requests will be dispatched and HTML/CSS pages must be served.
This approach is indeed very traditional for a web site, but not really convenient for a web service, which is not intended to be good looking, 24x7 up and running and UX-optimized. Instead, talking to a web service in a chat-bot mode would be much more convenient, both for a user and web service developer. In this session I will try to explain why chat-bot design is more preferable, what are the pros and cons.


source: ndc

Friday, 13 January 2017

Talk devops please: A .NET developers guide to 3rd party tools for better DevOps - Adam Cogan


DevOps is all about bringing the developers and operations together so that they are working as a team in the best interests of the product rather than themselves. Let's talk about the main goals you want to achieve by implementing good DevOps.
Microsoft is embracing the winning tools in the development space and is building them into the next version of Visual Studio. Things are looking better with the open sourcing of .NET and ASP.NET along with the release of the free Visual Studio Community Edition but you still need 3rd party tools for great devops. Come see Adam give you a tour and expand your development horizons that will include 15 tools starting with Azure Deployment Slots, Octopus, Testing in Production and more.

source: ndc

Thursday, 12 January 2017

So You Wanna Build a Service Bus? - William Brander


You don’t really need a service bus, do you? There are service bus offerings out there, but they’re too complex and opinionated. Surely it’s easy enough to write your own messaging layer over a queuing technology like RabbitMQ or SQS.

It doesn’t make sense to take a dependency on 3rd party software with millions of lines of code when you could have a lot more fun writing the perfect solution all by yourself. In this session, I’ll show you everything you need to know to build the ultimate service bus of your dreams from scratch.

After all: how hard could it be?

source: devday

Wednesday, 11 January 2017

Go - one language you should try - Andrzej Grzesik


Or why you should only write an eighth of the code. You live and breathe http. Most of the things you do with a computer involve it. How many tiny little http-related utils have you already created? Is it time to stop? By no means, we all do it. I'd just like to encourage you to write the next one in Go.
It's a fun little language, which feels like a cross-breed between C (pointers!) and ruby (concise, powerful syntax). But how much? Why, yet another language, but my perl/python/.. does all the things? Well, it does. But go has a few things that make it super sweet, is web-scale and real fun to use! Or at least come and listen how did we get rid of 87% of our codebase in a day :-)

source: ndc

Tuesday, 10 January 2017

F# Microservices with Logging, Tracing and More on Docker - Henrik Feldt



In this session, you will learn how to build a web application based on the microservice architecture from scratch using the Suave.io library. Henrik Feldt, contributor to Suave, will guide you through the whole process, starting with an introduction to Suave, adding logging using the Logary library and finishing with service discovery and deployment to Docker.

source: fsharp conf

Monday, 9 January 2017

ASP.NET Core Authentication Deep Dive - Anders Abel



ASP.NET Core is a fresh start. For authentication it means out with the old Http Modules’ events and in with a pipeline of Middleware. Middleware are loosely coupled components that are run by calling each other in a pipeline. They can be combined in different way. It can be a simple single cookie middleware used with an authentication form. Or it can be a powerful mixed authentication setup with multiple external providers (Google, Facebook, SAML2).
This deep dive starts with a closer look on how middleware are configured and how they interact during authentication. There will then be a look at how to implement a simple authentication middleware, identifying the different parts and how they relate to the overall pipeline model.

source: oredev

Sunday, 8 January 2017

10 Awesome Tips for Enterprise JavaScript - Geertjan Wielenga


JavaScript in the enterprise? Does that even make sense? After years of developing Java applications in the enterprise, many developers have become curious about what JavaScript can do for them. But how can you translate concepts like 'modularity' and 'loose coupling' to JavaScript applications? Do JavaScript applications have these kinds of concepts?
AngularJS is a popular solution in the JavaScript world, though there are many other solutions, too. In this session, you will be introduced to RequireJS, responsive JavaScript, mobile development with JavaScript, as well as JavaScript transpilers such as GWT, Vaadin, and DukeScript.
By the end of this session, you will have a thorough understanding of whether JavaScript is a sensible solution for you in developing enterprise JavaScript applications, today.


source: oredev

Saturday, 7 January 2017

Versions are evil - how to do without in your API - Sebastien Lambla


People change. And when you don't recognize them anymore, sometimes you'd be right in thinking they're just not the same person. APIs are the same, adding a version is the hard drug of web APIs, the first hit is free but you're going to pay later! We'll explore in practice what is wrong with versioning, and how we can manage change in our APIs over time without the need for them.

source: ndc

Friday, 6 January 2017

Get Started with Xamarin and Azure - Mike James


Xamarin's Mike James, Program Manager, shows you how to easily add powerful web services and mobile essential features to your Xamarin apps, leveraging the power of Azure App Service and your existing .NET skills.

Whether you’re a new mobile developer or an experienced enterprise team lead, Azure App Service and Xamarin give you everything you need to build engaging Android, iOS, and Windows apps.

In this webinar recording, you will:
- Learn how to deploy your first App Service
- See the .NET Client SDK in action
- Integrate with data and business systems, on-premises and in the cloud
- Enhance your apps with push notifications, user authentication, and more
- Add data and intelligence APIs to deepen user engagement
- Get the sample app code and documentation you need to get started

source: xamarin

Thursday, 5 January 2017

Getting Into the Zero Downtime Deployment World - Tugberk Ugurlu


Continuous delivery is a huge step forward in our ability to rapidly deliver features and value to the users of distributed applications, but it comes with a cost and a responsibility. Most modern web applications need to be highly available, and this also means that it should be up during the deployments. Dealing with zero-downtime deployments is a challenge, and there is no easy solution. Moreover, the solutions available vary based on the number of integrated clients, which parts of the World it addresses, how many active users it has... Isn’t there a simple way to figure out how to get there?
Join me to get into the details of the key steps on your path to zero downtime deployments. Learn about the patterns, practices and techniques that make it easier, such as semantic versioning and blue/green deployments. We’ll also walk through an end-to-end demo of how a high traffic web application can survive the challenge of deployments.
What seemed insurmountable at the start of the session will be practical and applicable by the time we’re finished, and you should be able to see how to start moving your production application close to the zero-downtime gold standard.

source: ndc

Wednesday, 4 January 2017

Elastic scaling in a (micro)service oriented architecture - Bastian Hofmann



Splitting an application up into multiple independent services can be a good way to keep it scaling and ensure stability and developer productivity in larger, growing teams. But just splitting the codebase, creating APIs and deploying the code on some servers is not enough, somehow your services need to know where and how other services are accessible. Classical approaches like hardcoding everything in every service or having a central load-balancer can quickly lead to problems in terms of scalability and maintainability.
In this talk I'll show how we at ResearchGate tackled this challenge. With the help of tools like Consul and haproxy we created a setup that allows us to quickly boot and shutdown services. This ensures that all servers are utilized optimally and load spikes can be reacted upon quickly and automatically.

source: ndc

Tuesday, 3 January 2017

Beyond Docker Buzzwords - Kiruthika Samapathy


No one has escaped the Docker wave and the mention of zero overhead virtualization excites everyone.
It is convenient to describe Docker as ‘Docker is like a lightweight VM’. But easily we forget the emphasis on like, and treat our applications like VMs. Deployments might be quicker, easier with Docker but that does not mean that scalability comes with it for free.
Most of us would have played with Docker and know how to build, run and ship applications as containers. So where do we go next?
Docker could be leveraged from enabling the developer to push his code to Production on their day 1, to making the build pipeline/testing more efficient. So the real value is just not in using Docker, but more about how do we build our systems using Docker.
This talk will take a pragmatic look at Docker use cases and some misconceptions.

source: ndc

Monday, 2 January 2017

Innovate and Invigorate Your Agile Discovery Practices - Ellen Gottesdiener


Agile product discovery is essential for continuous delivery of high-quality solutions. Yet many teams struggle to collaboratively discover inventive and valuable product requirements. Instead, they become reliant, and at times overly reliant on user stories, story maps, and personas. While these techniques are useful, they are not sufficient for the complex products most teams wrestle with today. Join Ellen Gottesdiener as she shares how to reach beyond discovery-as-usual. You’ll learn how your team can apply creative ways to enlighten and energize your agile product discovery, to bring requirements to light, explore true value, and build better products.

source: cohaaorg

Sunday, 1 January 2017

Everyone Can Create Beautiful Apps with Material Design – James Montemagno & Jérémie Laval


Building beautiful Android apps doesn't have to be hard. Since its original induction, Material Design (MD) has taken the Android world by storm, generating rapid adoption throughout the dev community. A lot has changed from the original material design specification, with the updates to the Android Support v7 AppCompat library and intro of the Support Design library, MD themes, controls, and features now available on all devices running Android. This session will show you how to transform your app into a stunning work of Material art, and even how to utilize MD in your Xamarin.Forms apps.

source: xamarin evolve